American Forts: East

SOUTH CAROLINA

Fort Alston | Ashepoo Fort | Barton's Post | Biggin Bridge Redoubt | Botany Bay Island Post
Bulls Island Fort | Cat Island Battery (2) | Cattell's Fort | Chapman's Fort | Camp Chehaw
Camp Chestnut | Chicken's Fort | Fort Corner | Fort Dorchester | Fort Drayton
Edisto Bluff Fort | Edisto Island Lookout Post (1) | Edisto Island Post (2) | Elliott's Fort
Fort Euhanie | Camp Evans | Fenwick Island Post | Ford's Fort | Frazier's Point Battery
Georgetown Battery (2) | Georgetown Fort (1) | Godfrey's Fort | Camp Harlee | Hasell's Fort
Fort Heyward | Hobcaw Point Battery (3) | Camp Hunter | Huntington Beach Radar Station
Jackson's Fort | Laurel Hill Fort | Camp Lookout | Camp Magill | Marion's Camp (1)
Camp Marion (2) | Camp Marion (3) | Mayrant's Bluff Battery | Mepkin Plantation Fort
Camp Middleton | Moncks Corner Redoubt | Mulberry Plantation Fort | Camp Myrtle Beach
Camp Norman | North Island Battery | Otter Island Lookout Post | Parker's Ferry
Ponds Plantation Fort | Fort Randall | Rantowles Defenses | Richbourg's Fort
Richmond Hill Battery | St. Giles Plantation Fort | Santee Point Battery | Snow's Island Camp
South Island Battery | Battery at Sparkman's | Stono Bridge Fort | Camp Trapier
Camp Waccamaw | Wachesaw Battery | Wantoot Plantation Fort | Fort Ward | Battery Warren
Fort Wassamassaw | (Fort) Battery White | Willtown Fort | Winyah Bay Blockhouse
Fort Winyah (1) | Fort Winyaw (2) | Woodward's Fort | Fort Wool

Greater Charleston Area I - page 2 | Greater Charleston Area II - page 3
Port Royal Sound Area - page 4 | Interior South Carolina - page 5

SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORY TRAIL

Last Update: 11/JANUARY/2015
Compiled by Pete Payette - ©2015 American Forts Network

Fort Randall
(1861 - 1865), near Little River
A CSA four-gun earthwork battery and blockhouse at Tilghman's Point on Little River Neck. Union naval forces briefly captured the battery in January 1863. No remains of the battery, and only a slight mound and depression marks the site of the blockhouse, located on private property.

Camp Myrtle Beach
(Myrtle Beach State Park)
(1942 - 1944), Myrtle Beach
The 312-acre state park was taken over by the Army in early 1942 as a coastal defense shore patrol base camp. Several of the still extant 1930's C.C.C.-built buildings were converted to Army use (barracks and supply). The park was returned to the state in March 1945.

Fort Ward
(1861 - 1862), near Murrells Inlet
A CSA three-gun earthwork battery. Abandoned and disarmed in March 1862, never re-used. Exact location unknown, lost to the shifting sand bars and surf erosion over time.

CSA Camp Lookout (date ?) was located on the coast nearby. CSA Camp Waccamaw (1862 - 1864) was located somewhere inland.

Huntington Beach Radar Station
(Huntington Beach State Park)
(1942 - 1945), Huntington Beach
A WWII anti-aircraft spotting station and an SCR-271 early warning radar was located here near the former Brookgreen/Atalaya estate (built 1932). The state park was created in 1960.

Laurel Hill Battery
(Brookgreen Gardens)
(1861 - 1862), near Murrells Inlet
A CSA gun battery located on a bluff along the Waccamaw River at Laurel Hill Plantation. Remnants still exist of the earthworks, located in a limited-access area on the north side of Brookgreen Gardens (admission fee).

Richmond Hill Battery
(1861 - 1862), near Murrells Inlet
A CSA gun battery located on the Waccamaw River at the Richmond Hill Plantation, owned by John Magill.
SC Dept. of Archives and History

CSA Camp Magill (1861) was located at the nearby plantation of Dr. Joseph Magill, brother (?) to John.

Wachesaw Battery
(Wachesaw Plantation Property Owners Association)
(1863), near Murrells Inlet
A CSA gun battery located on a bluff along the Waccamaw River at the Wachesaw Plantation. Built by Allard Flagg, owner of the plantation. Earthworks still remain, site marked in the preserved Wachesaw Plantation Nature Reserve. Public access restricted, private gated community.

Fort Euhanie
(1716 - unknown), Yauhannah
A fortified trading post established by the SC colonial government, located at "Great Bluff". The site has reportedly been excavated in the recent past.

Battery at Sparkman's
(1861 - 1862), near Oatland ?
A CSA gun battery located on the Black River at Sparkman's Plantation, located about 22 miles upriver from Georgetown. Attacked by Union gunboats in July 1862.

Snow's Island Camp
(1781), near Johnsonville
Patriot leader Francis Marion, the "Swamp Fox", established a secret base here near William Goddard's Plantation to harrass the British army. Also known as Marion's Camp (1). The British located and destroyed the camp in March 1781, but Marion and his men continued operations elsewhere. Located on the Great Pee Dee River at the convergence of the Lynches River and Muddy Creek. The island is private property, not accessible to the public.

Winyah Bay Blockhouse
(1526), near Georgetown
The first Spanish colonization attempt north of Mexico landed on Cabo de San Nicolás (present-day Winyah Bay), but did not settle here. Spanish documents of the period place the landing at 33 degrees, 30 (or 40) minutes north latitude, within a present-day 30 minute margin of error. A fort or blockhouse was possibly built here as the two ships were repaired after running aground on sand bars. Meanwhile, the bulk of the 600 colonists, led by Lucas Vásquez de Ayllón, headed 40-45 Spanish leagues southwest by land towards Sapelo Sound, Georgia, in order to find a suitable settlement site. They most likely settled on St. Catherines Island. (please see GEORGIA page 1)

Fort Winyah (1)
(1715 - 1716), near Oatland ? or Brown's Ferry ?
A SC colonial militia fort located on the south side of the Black River, northwest of Georgetown.

Georgetown Fort (1)
(1780 - 1782, 1794), Georgetown
An unnamed British earthwork fort, attacked by Patriots under Francis Marion in January 1781. Exact location undetermined.
NOTE: Georgetown was occupied by the British from July 1780 until the summer of 1782.

An unnamed and incomplete American First System earthwork battery (1794) was later located in the vicinity, possibly at Blythe's Point.

Fort Winyaw (2)
(1810 - 1814), Georgetown
An American Second System brick and tabby fort located on Blythe's (Sampit) Point. It was in ruins by 1826. A lighthouse was built here after 1857.

Winyah Bay Civil War Defenses
(1862 - 1865), near Georgetown
(Fort) Battery White a ten-gun CSA earthwork located on Mayrant's Bluff at the present-day Belle Isle Gardens Yacht Club condo complex, four miles south of town. Captured by the Union in February 1865. Restored in 1961, two 10-inch guns still remain at the preserved earthworks. 1929 U.D.C. monument on site. Restricted public access, since 1974 a private gated community. Site easement held by the S.C. Battleground Preservation Trust. See also S.C. Dept. of Archives and History
Fort Wool a CSA land-defense battery (two guns) located about 1000 yards behind Battery White. No remains.
Frazier's Point Battery a CSA earthwork battery (four guns) located at the Calais Plantation on the Hobcaw Barony near Strawberry, directly across the channel from Battery White. Also known as Hobcaw Point Battery (3). Still exists. Camp Trapier (1864) was also probably located near here. Public access by guided tours only through the Hobcaw Barony Discovery Center. See also S.C. Dept. of Archives and History

The Georgetown Lighthouse (1801, rebuilt 1868), located on the south end of North Island, was used by the Confederates in 1861 as a lookout post. A gun battery (Fort Alston (1861 - 1862)) and tent camp (Camp Norman) was also located here (no remains). Another small unnamed battery was located on the north end of the island at North Inlet (no remains). Abandoned by the Confederates in March 1862, North Island was formally "captured" by the Union Navy in May 1862.
Unnamed CSA earthwork batteries (1861 - 1862) were also located on the north end of South Island (six guns), and on Cat Island (2) (five guns) near Quarantine. Abandoned in March 1862. The Cat Island battery is still extant. All three islands are presently part of the Tom Yawkey Wildlife Center State Heritage Preserve. Public access restricted.

Camp Marion (2) a CSA camp located about two miles from Georgetown at "White's Bridge".
Camp Chestnut a CSA camp (undetermined location).
Camp Harlee a CSA camp (undetermined location).
Camp Middleton a CSA camp (undetermined location).

Georgetown Battery (2)
(1898 - 1899), near Georgetown
In 1898 two 7-inch BL seige howitzers were temporarily emplaced in sandbag revetments near the ruins of CSA Fort White. Two 5-inch BL rifles were emplaced inside the ruins. All four guns were later replaced with four 12-pdr guns, and all were removed in 1899.

Santee Point Battery
(1861), South Island
A temporary CSA earthwork battery (three guns) was located at the mouth of the North Santee River, on the south end of South Island. Abandoned and transferred to Cat Island after only a few months.

Rev. Claude de Richbourg's Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Jamestown ?, Berkeley County
A French Huguenot settler's fortified home during the Yamassee War, located somewhere along the south bank of the Santee River about 20 miles east-northeast of Moncks Corner. Exact location undetermined.

Battery Warren
(Francis Marion National Forest)
(1863 - 1865), Berkeley County
A CSA earthwork battery on the Santee River below Echaw Creek. Still extant along a one mile walking trail within the Francis Marion National Forest. Restored in 2009.
October 2009 volunteer restoration from US Forest Service

Fort Corner
(no date), Fort Corner
The name most likely is linked to the prominent Fort family of Berkeley County and not a military construction.

Bulls Island Fort ? ?
(Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge - Bulls Island Unit)
(1707 ?, 1780's ?, 1862), Bulls Island
Ruins still remain of a circular stone fort, located on Old Fort Road at the mouth of Jacks Creek at Bull Harbor. Bulls Bay was once a haven for pirates in the early 1700's. The SC colonial militia had a lookout posted here in 1707 against pirate activity, one of six such posts on the outlying barrier islands during this time, and was intermittently garrisoned for several decades. The island was later used as a supply base by the British Navy during the American Revolution. The stone fort was probably built, or at least used by, the Confederates in the Civil War. The Union Navy destroyed the CSA fort and magazine here in December 1862. The island became part of the Cape Romain NWR in 1936. Public day-use access by passenger ferry (fee) from Garris Landing on Sewee Bay. The fort ruins are about a 2.5 mile hike from the dock on the island.

William Ford's Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Wando ?
A settlers' fortified house during the Yamassee War, located on the west side of the Wando River about ten miles or so northeast of Charleston. Exact location undetermined.

Rev. Thomas Hasell's Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Middleburg Plantation ?
A settlers' refuge fort during the Yamassee War, located on the east bank of the East Branch Cooper River at Pompion Hill, which was about 12 miles southeast of Moncks Corner.

Mepkin Plantation Fort
(1680, 1715 - 1716), Mepkin
A settlers' fortified house during the 1680 Westo War, and the 1715 Yamassee War, built by James, Peter, and Thomas Colleton. Located on the east bank of the West Branch Cooper River, about 6.25 miles southeast of Moncks Corner.

Wantoot Plantation Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Bonneau Beach
A settlers' fortified house during the Yamassee War, originally built in 1712 by Pierre de St. Julian, located about seven and one-half miles north of Moncks Corner. The original house was burned by Union troops during the Civil War. The actual site is now under Lake Moultrie, impounded in the 1940's.

Mulberry Plantation Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Oakley
A settlers' fortified home during the Yamassee War, built by Thomas Broughton. Located on the west bank of the West Branch Cooper River about three and one-half miles south of Moncks Corner. The later brick mansion (1725 ?) was built over the loop-holed cellar foundations of the original house.
South Carolina Plantations

Moncks Corner Redoubt
(1780 - 1781), Moncks Corner
British troops built redoubts here and at Biggin Bridge (location ?). Patriot forces captured both works in 1781.

Fort Wassamassaw
(1715 - 1716), Berkeley County
A settlers' fort during the Yamassee War, located on Ralph Izard's cowpen at Clear Spring (aka "The Cypress"), about six miles northwest of Summerville near the Wassamassaw Swamp at the head of the Ashley River.

Col. George Chicken's Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Strawberry ?
A settlers' fortified house during the Yamassee War, located about nine miles northeast of Summerville.

Edisto Bluff Fort
(1715 - 1718), Givhans Ferry
A SC colonial militia fort at Givhans Ferry on the east bank of the Edisto River, guarding the backdoor to Charleston during the Yamassee War. Located on James Rawlings' plantation "Edisto Bluff", near today's Givhans Ferry State Park.

Camp David Hunter
(1875), Summerville
A summer encampment for three Coast Artillery companies from Charleston.

Camp Marion (3)
(1898 - 1899), Summerville
A Spanish-American War winter camp for northern troops. Located southwest of town near the old Pine Forest Inn, which is the present-day Shephard Park.

Ponds Plantation Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Slandsville
A settlers' fortified house during the Yamassee War, located on Andrew Percival's plantation "The Ponds" (aka Weston Hall) on the east side of the Ashley River about six miles southwest of Summerville.

St. Giles Plantation Fort
(1680, 1715 - 1716), near Cooke Crossroads
A settlers' fortified house during the 1680 Westo War and the 1715 Yamassee War. Located on the east bank of the Ashley River about five miles south-southwest of Summerville, upriver from Old Dorchester.

Fort Dorchester
(Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site)
(The Fort at Colonial Dorchester)
(1697 ? - 1720's ?, 1775 - 1782), Old Dorchester FORT WIKI
A tabby fort was originally built sometime between 1697 and 1719 for the town's protection. A brick powder magazine enclosed by a tabby wall was built in 1757. The town was fortified during the American Revolution, and changed hands several times. The current fort remains are mostly from the 1775 work. The brick bell tower on site is from 1751. The British garrisoned the town from April 1780 to December 1781. The town declined after the war and was largely abandoned by 1788.

Richard Godfrey's Fort
(1715 - 1716), Middleton Place Gardens
A settlers' fortified home used by the SC colonial militia during the Yamassee War, located on the west side of the Ashley River about 14 miles northwest of Charleston. The Middleton Place Plantation manor was later built here in 1738.

Peter Cattell's Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Middleton Place Gardens
A settlers' fortified house during the Yamassee War, located on the Ashley Hall Plantation on the west side of the Ashley River about 13 miles northwest of Charleston.


(see pages 2 and 3 for Greater Charleston area fortifications)


Stono Bridge Fort
(1715 - 1716), Town of Johns Island
A SC colonial militia fort located on the north bank of the Stono River on John Beamer's plantation, about 11 miles west of Charleston, to protect the bridge to Johns Island during the Yamassee War.

Thomas Elliott's Fort
(1715 - 1716), near Rantowles
A settlers' fortified home located on the west bank of Rantowles Creek about 12 miles west of Charleston, used by the SC colonial militia during the Yamassee War.

Rantowles Area Defenses
(1863 - 1865), Rantowles
Several CSA batteries were located on the western outskirts of Charleston:
Rantowles Station Battery, at the old railroad station, south of Wallace Creek.
Rantowles Battery, in the old village, north of Wallace Creek.
Battery Bulow (?), on Rantowles Creek at Bulow Landing.
Stono Ferry Batteries, two works on the Stono River at the present-day Links at Stono Ferry Golf Course. Possibly still exists.
Camp Evans (date ?), a CSA camp at Church Flats along the Stono River, near Stono Ferry.
Warren Batteries, three works near Warren Crossroads along present-day SC 165.

Parker's Ferry Earthworks
(1782), near Jacksonboro
Patriot earthworks protected the ferry and a supply depot here. Earthworks still exist along the western bank of the Edisto River. A marker is located about 3.5 miles north of town. The last battle of the American Revolution along the eastern seaboard occurred here along the Edisto and Combahee Rivers in August 1782.

John Jackson's Fort
(1715 - 1716), Jacksonboro
A settlers' fort during the Yamassee War to protect the Pon Pon Bridge over the Edisto River. The settlement was then known as Pon Pon. An Apalachee Indian war party crossed the river undiscovered in July 1715 and devastated the settlements to the Stono River, burning the bridge at Pon Pon on their withdrawal. Apparently the fort had been abandoned for some reason at that time, or had yet to be built.

Willtown Fort
(ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve)
(1715 - 1716), Willtown Bluff
A SC colonial militia fort on the east bank of the Edisto River at the old Willtown (aka New London) settlement (founded 1682). Attacked by Apalachee Indians in 1715. Used as a base for SC colonial patrol boats in 1716.

Botany Bay Island Post
(Botany Bay Plantation State Heritage Preserve and Wildlife Management Area)
(1862 - 1865), Botany Bay Island
A Union occupied island after the capture of Port Royal Sound. Bleak Hall Plantation was here at the time. Part of the island is currently under conservation easement with The Nature Conservancy.

Edisto Island Lookout Post (1)
(18th century, intermittent), Edisto Island
A SC colonial militia lookout post or watch house was located here sometime between 1715 and 1764.

Edisto Island Post (2)
(1862 - 1865), Edisto Island
A Union occupied island after the capture of Port Royal Sound. The extant 1810 William Seabrook House (Dodge Plantation) was used as headquarters, and the extant 1847 Cassina Point Plantation house has still-visible graffitti on the basement walls.

Otter Island Lookout Post
(18th century, intermittent), Otter Island
A SC colonial militia lookout post or watch house was located here sometime between 1715 and 1764.

Fort Drayton
(St. Helena Sound State Heritage Preserve)
(1861 - 1865), Otter Island
A CSA triangular earthen fort with a wet moat, originally named Fort Heyward. It was captured by the Union after the Confederates abandoned it in December 1861, after the fall of Port Royal, and was renamed. The Union troops built a wooden signal tower here to relay communications between Hilton Head Island and Folly Island. Remnants of the fort still exist. Public day-use visitation is allowed, boat access only.

Fenwick Island Post
(ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve)
(1861 - 1865), Fenwick Island
A Union occupied island after the capture of Port Royal Sound.

Chapman's Fort
(ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve)
(1860's), near Airy Hall ?
A CSA two-gun earthwork fort on the Ashepoo River. Union naval vessels attacked the fort in May 1864.

Camp Chehaw
(ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve)
(1860's), Colleton County
A CSA cavalry encampment on Chehaw Neck along Chehaw Road near old Ballouville.

Barton's Post or
(1781), Colleton County
A battle/skirmish occurred here in April 1781. Undetermined location (near Red Hill ?).

John Woodward's Fort
(ACE Basin National Estuarine Research Reserve)
(1715 - 1717), near Ashepoo Crossing
A SC colonial militia fort during the Yamassee War, located on the west bank of the Ashepoo River south of Ritter.

Ashepoo Fort
(1760 - 1761), near Walterboro ?
A settlers' fort located somewhere near the head of the Ashepoo River, built during the panic of the upcountry Cherokee War. Exact location undetermined.


Greater Charleston Area I - page 2 | Greater Charleston Area II - page 3
Port Royal Sound Area - page 4 | Interior South Carolina - page 5

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Eastern Forts