Southern Georgia

Fort Adams | Fort Alert | Fort Apalachicola | Camp Augusta | Fort Barnum | Blackshear Camp
Bosomworth's Fort | Bush's Fort | Camp Churchman | Fort Clark (2) | Camp Clyatt
Cooper's Post | Camp Crawford | Fort Dearborn | Fort Early | Fort Floyd (2) | Camp Forse
Fort Futch | Fort Gaines | Camp Gilman | Fort Gilmer (3) | Fort Green (2) | Fort Hartford
Fort Henderson | Fort Hughes | Fort Ingersol | Fort Jones | Fort Laurens
Lumpkin Blockhouse (1) | Fort McCranie | Fort McCreary | Fort McIntosh (2) | Fort McLane
Fort Miller (1) | Fort Mitchell | Fort Morrison | Fort La Motte | Fort Mudge | Fort Muse
Nicholls' Outpost | North's Station | Fort Norton (1) | Norton's Station | Fort Peterson
Fort Pike | Camp Pinckney | Camp Recovery | Fort Repose | Fort Rosa | Sabacola el Menor
Fort Scott (1) | Smith's Fort | Camp Sumter | Fort Tatnall (1) | Thomasville Camp
Fort Tompkins | Camp Townsend | Fort Walker (1) | Camp Ware | Camp Wilde | Fort Wilkins

Spanish Missions
(NOT INDEXED)

North Coastal Georgia - page 1 | Savannah Area - page 2
South Coastal Georgia - page 3 | Central Georgia - page 5
Greater Atlanta - page 6 | Northwestern Georgia - page 7
Northern Georgia - page 8

GEORGIA CIVIL WAR HERITAGE TRAIL
HISTORIC CHATTAHOOCHEE COMMISSION

Last Update: 30/JULY/2017
Compiled by Pete Payette - ©2017 American Forts Network

Colonial Spanish Missions of Timucua
Spanish Missions in Georgia from the New Georgia Encyclopedia

The following Franciscan Missions were established without presidios or other military protection, and are listed here purely for historical interest. They were abandoned after the 1656 Timucua Rebellion. The Timucua Province encompased the inland area from between the Altamaha River and the Little / Withlacoochee Rivers, then southward between the St. Johns River and the Suwannee River in Florida, towards the Ocala area, but not including the Gulf coastal area. See also Eastern Florida.

Santa Isabel de Utinahica (1610 - 1640), at the "Forks of the Altamaha River", east of Lumber City.
San Lorenzo de Ibihica (1620 - 1656), near Folkston. Destroyed by Indians.
Santiago de Oconi (1620 - 1656), in the Okefenokee Swamp region west of Ibihica. Destroyed by Indians.
Santa Maria de los Angeles de Arapaja (1625 - 1657), near Statenville.
Santa Cruz de Cachipile (1625 - 1657), near Clyattville.

information courtesy of John Worth


Seminole Wars Forts

Charlton County:
Camp Augusta (date ?), Race Pond.
Fort Henderson (1838 - 1842), two and one-half miles west of Coleraine.
Fort Tompkins (date ?), eight miles west of Coleraine near Folkston
Camp Pinckney (1836 ?, 1838), a supply depot on the St. Mary's River. Marker located two miles east of Folkston on GA 40.

Ware County:
Fort Mudge (1813, 1838), Fort Mudge.
Fort A. S. Miller (1) (1838), southeast of Manor.
Fort Muse (1838), a blockhouse east of Fort Miller, southeast of Glenmore.
Fort McLane (1813), a blockhouse east of Fort Floyd, southeast of Needham.
Fort Floyd (2) (1838 - 1839), west of Okefenokee.
Camp Wilde (1838), near Fort Floyd.
Camp Ware (1838), Waresboro.

Clinch County:
Fort Rosa (1841), on the Suwannee River at "Blunt's Ferry". Also known as Norton's (or North's) Station. Regarrisoned in 1842 as Fort Norton (1), aka Fort Repose.
Fort Dearborn (1838), reportedly located 13 miles south of Fort Floyd (2), near Fargo at the confluence of Suwanoochee Creek and the Suwannee River. State marker near site.
Fort Tatnall (1) (1838), on the Suwannee River northeast of Fargo.
Fort Barnum (1840), a blockhouse north of Fort Tatnall.
Smith's Fort (date ?), Argyle, a blockhouse.

Echols County:
Fort Gilmer (3) (1838 - 1841), southwest of Fargo on the Suwannee River, below Suwanoochee Creek. State marker on US 441 has been removed or is missing.

Unknown locations:
Fort La Motte (1838)
Fort Walker (1) (1838), a blockhouse northeast of Fort Tatnall on "Chepucky Island" (location ?).


Fort Alert
(1812 - 1818, 1835 - 1836), Trader's Hill
A stockaded settlers' refuge and trading post. Also known as Trader's Hill Post. Regarrisoned, or rebuilt entirely, in 1835 by the GA state militia. This was near the head of navigation on the St. Marys River. Marker located on GA 23 three miles southwest of Folkston.

Blackshear Prison Camp
(1864), Blackshear
A temporary Union POW camp built in November 1864 after Camp Lawton was threatened by the advance of Union General Sherman's "March to the Sea". The 5000 prisoners here were then transferred to Thomasville in December 1864. State marker on GA 203 just north of site. See also Civil War Prisons in Georgia from the New Georgia Encyclopedia

Fort (John) Peterson
(1830's ?), Huffer
A settlers' stockaded fort enclosing two or three acres, with several dwellings for refugee families.

Camp Clyatt
(1836), near Clyattville
A temporary encampment of the GA state militia during the Second Creek War. Site located east of town.

Camp Townsend
(1836), Lowndes County
A temporary encampment during the Second Creek War.

Fort Futch
(1836), near Adel
A settlers' fort on the Withlacoochee River east of town, at "Futch's Ferry".

Fort McCranie
(1836), near Chaserville
A settlers' fort on Brushy (Bushy ?) Creek. The Battle of Bushy Creek took place nearby in 1836.

Fort Morrison
(1836), near Adel
A settlers' fort on Morrison Creek south of town.

Thomasville Prison Camp
(1864), Thomasville
A temporary five-acre Union POW camp built when raids were feared on Camp Sumter in Andersonville. 5000 Union POWs were also transferred here in December 1864 from the camp in Blackshear. All prisoners were then taken back to Camp Sumter in January 1865. State marker at site on Wolf Street. "Dead line" trenches still remain. See also Civil War Prisons in Georgia from the New Georgia Encyclopedia

Fort Hughes
(1817), Bainbridge
A temporary stockade, a subpost of Fort Scott (1). The site is located in J.D. Chason Memorial Park. It served as a supply depot during the First Seminole War. Monument on site. State Marker located four blocks east of actual site.

Fort Scott (1)
(Lake Seminole Project - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers)
(1816 - 1821), near Bethany
Command post for Andrew Jackson's Seminole Campaign of 1818. Originally called Camp Crawford, it was fortified and renamed soon thereafter, but was briefly abandoned from December 1816 until the spring of 1817. The fort was dismantled in 1821. The site, managed by the Army Corps of Engineers on the north bank of the Flint River, was almost inundated by the impoundment of Lake Seminole in 1947 - 1957. An 1880's monument was moved to J.D. Chason Memorial Park in Bainbridge. Historic info is at the Lake Seminole Visitor Center on Booster Club Road, north of Chattahoochee, FL. State Marker on the south side of the Flint River at Hutchinson's Ferry Landing.

Three miles southeast of the Fort Scott site, in Recovery, was Camp Recovery (1820), a hospital camp for Fort Scott. A cannon marks the site. State Marker || Another state marker located in Bainbridge.

Mission de la Encarnación a la Santa Cruz
(1675 - unknown), near Chattahoochee, FL
A Spanish Franciscan mission located near the confluence of the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers. Served the Sabacola Indians. In intermittent use, it was not known to be fortified.
* Listed here for historical interest only. *

Sabacola el Menor
(1717 - 1724), near Chattahoochee, FL
The Christianized Sabacola Indian town was stockaded for protection against the British. The village was abandoned after a raid by British-allied Indians in 1724. The site is under Lake Seminole. State marker at Lake Seminole State Park.

Fort Apalachicola
(1755), near Chattahoochee, FL
A British work at the confluence of the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers. Site inundated by Lake Seminole.

Col. Edward Nicholls' Outpost
(1814), near Chattahoochee, FL
A British outpost of Fort Nicholls (Gadsden), FL, built at the confluence of the Flint and Chattahoochee Rivers. It was never completed, then abandoned. Presumed site inundated by Lake Seminole.

Fort Gaines
(Fort Gaines Frontier Village)
(1814 - 1819, 1836, 1863 - 1864), Fort Gaines
A recreated pioneer frontier village located south of town on Bluff Street is the original site of the post. The original settlers' fort was rebuilt with two blockhouses and garrisoned by Federal troops 1815 - 1819. It was dismantled by 1830. One of the blockhouses (Outpost Replica) has been reconstructed in town on Commerce Street. A temporary stockade was built here in 1836 by the GA state militia (marker erected in 1996). A CSA three-gun earthwork battery by the same name was also built here. One of the batteries and one surviving gun can still be seen on the bluff. Founding Fort Gaines state marker || See also History of the City of Fort Gaines

Fort Jones
(1836), near Florence
A temporary log stockade built by the GA state militia. State marker located on GA 39 two miles south of town. Settlers from Roanoke fled here when the town was burned by Creeks in May 1836. See also Battle of Roanoke from Explore Southern History.com
Troops from this position rescued others during the nearby Battle of Shepherd's Plantation (June 1836).

Fort Ingersol
(1836), Florence
A temporary log stockade built by the GA state militia. A state marker locates the site one mile east of town on GA 39C (marker missing or removed). The town of Florence was founded in 1837 (originally named Liverpool) after the Creek Indians burned the nearby town of Roanoke in May 1836.

Fort McCreary
(1836), near Omaha
A GA state militia fort on Fort Hill, about one mile south of town, or about one mile north of Florence. Tours of the preserved site (no visible remains of fort) can be arranged through the staff at Florence Marina State Park. State marker on GA 39.

Lumpkin Blockhouse (1)
(1836), Lumpkin
The original Stewart County Courthouse, constructed of logs, was built in 1830 and fortified in 1836 during the Second Creek War.

Camp Sumter
(Andersonville National Historic Site)
(1864 - 1865), Andersonville
A notorious POW camp for Union troops during the Civil War. There were eight defensive earthworks around the camp, some of which still remain. 50,000 Union prisoners were here at one time or another. 13,000 died here. The stockade has been reconstructed. On site is the National Prisoner of War Museum, which opened in 1998. The POW camp site and the National Cemetery were administered by the Army from 1910 - 1971. Of interest nearby is Andersonville Civil War Village. See also Civil War Prisons in Georgia from the New Georgia Encyclopedia

Camp Gilman
(1898 - 1899), Americus
A Spanish-American War winter training camp. Originally named Camp Forse briefly. Located about two miles south of town at "Rylander's Farm", near the present-day country club at 1800 South Lee Road.

Camp Churchman
(1898), Albany
A Spanish-American War muster-out camp. Located about two miles north of town on the south bank of Kinchafoonee Creek along Old Leesburg Road (GA 133), at the former American Legion golf course. The camp hospital was located at Tift Park at North Jefferson and Seventh Ave..

Fort Early
(1814 - 1818), near Coney
A temporary stockaded fort on the Flint River, manned by the GA state militia and Federal troops. No remains. Actual site owned and marked by the D.A.R..

Fort Mitchell
(1813), Dooly or Pulaski Counties ?
One of four stockaded forts west of Hawkinsville on the Blackshear Trail.
(NOTE: apparently not the same as Fort Mitchell in Alabama)

Fort Pike
(1813), Dooly or Pulaski Counties ?
One of four stockaded forts west of Hawkinsville on the Blackshear Trail.

Fort Green (2)
(1813), Dooly or Pulaski Counties ?
One of four stockaded forts on the Blackshear Trail, constructed about 10 miles apart, located west of Hawkinsville to protect the frontier.

Fort Laurens
(1813), Pulaski County ?
One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from the Creek Indians. Undetermined location.

Fort Hartford
(1813 - unknown), Hawkinsville
A GA state militia stockaded fort built to protect against the Creek Indians. The Blackshear Trail was built in 1814 from here to Fort Early on the Flint River.

Bush's Fort
(1790's - 1795), Laurens County
A settlers' fort destroyed by Indians in October 1795. Site located near Ben Hall Lake west of Lovett.

Fort Adams
(1813), Telfair County ?
One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from the Creek Indians. Undetermined location.

Fort Clark (2)
(1813), Telfair County ?
One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from the Creek Indians. Undetermined location.

Fort McIntosh (2)
(1813), Telfair County ?
One of a string of forts built along the Ocmulgee River to protect settlers from the Creek Indians. Undetermined location.

Mary Bosomworth's Trading Fort
(1746 - unknown), near Charlotteville
A settlers' fortified trading post, located on the north side of the "Forks of the Altamaha River", south of town. Mary Bosomworth (aka Cowsaponakeesa), a half-Creek Indian and the niece of Chigelley, the principal mico of the Lower Creek Nation, was the recent widow of trader Jacob Mathews of Fort Mount Venture, and had now married the Rev. Thomas Bosomworth. She was a valuable go-between and interpreter for the GA colonial militia and General James Oglethorpe.


NEED MORE INFO: Fort Wilkins (1800's ?) on the Oconee River frontier (location ?); Cooper's Post (civilian, 1836) west of Withlacoochee River (may actually be in Florida). Fort Hill in East Albany.
Towns:

North Coastal Georgia - page 1 | Savannah Area - page 2 | South Coastal Georgia - page 3
Central Georgia - page 5 | Greater Atlanta - page 6 | Northwestern Georgia - page 7
Northern Georgia - page 8

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Eastern Forts