Central Texas

Camp Archer | Austin Arsenal | Camp Austin (1) | Camp Austin (2) | Fort Austin (1)
Austin Ground School | Post of Austin (2,3) | Barker's Fort | Camp Bell (2) | Camp Bell (3)
Black's Fort | Blanco Fort Houses | Fort Bryant | Bryant's Fort | Bryant's Station
Camp Burleson | Camp Caldwell (2) | Fort Cameron | Camp Cazneau (1) | Camp Cazneau (2)
Fort Cazneau | Childers' Settlement Station | Fort Coleman | Camp Colorado | Fort Colorado
Camp Cooke (1) | Camp Croghan | Fort Croghan | Camp Davis (2) | J. Duncan's Fort
Fort Dunnington | Duty's Fort (1) | Fort Griffin (1) | Camp Hamilton (1) | Hamilton's Fort
Post on Hamilton Creek | Hornsby's Fort | Hornsby's Station | Camp Houston
Fort Houston (2) | Kenney's Fort | La Grange Arsenal | Camp Lamar | Fort Lamar (1a)
Little River Fort | Camp Llano | Camp Lynch | Camp Mabry | McCulloch's Station
Camp McLeod | Camp McMillan | Fort Magruder (2) | Fort Mason | Fort Mina | Mitchell's Fort
J. Moore's Fort | Camp Navarro | Fort Puesta del Colorado | Ridgeway's Fort | Ross' Fort
Presidio de San Francisco Xavier | Camp San Gabriel | Camp San Sabá (2)
Presidio de San Xavier de Gigedo | Camp Sanders | Fort Martin Scott | Camp Slaughter (2)
Fort Smith (1) | Tumlinson's Blockhouse | Camp Walker | Camp Walnut Creek (2)
Camp on Walnut Creek (1) | Webber's Fort | Fort Wells | Wells' Fort | Wilbarger's Fort
Woods' Fort

East Texas - page 1 | Coastal Texas I - page 2 | Coastal Texas II - page 3
North Central Texas - page 4 | South Central Texas - page 6 | Southern Texas - page 7
West Texas - page 8 | Southwestern Texas - page 9

TEXAS HISTORIC SITES ATLAS
TEXAS FRONTIER FORTS
LEN KUBIAK'S TEXAS HISTORY

FORT WIKI - TEXAS

Last Update: 01/MAY/2016
Compiled by Phil and Pete Payette - ©2016 American Forts Network

La Grange Arsenal
(1842 - 1845), La Grange
A temporary Texas Republic arsenal or storehouse was located here after Austin was evacuated due to the Mexican Army's capture of San Antonio in March 1842. The weapons and powder were still here in 1844. No troops were posted here at the time.

Col. John Henry Moore's Fort
(1826 - 1838), Round Top
A settlers' stockade with two blockhouses. Originally located in La Grange, built by James Ross in 1826 (James Ross' Fort). Sold to Moore in 1828 and renamed. Moore moved north of La Grange in 1838. The structure was later moved here for restoration. An American Legion Post (built 1994) now occupies the original site.

Zadoc Woods' Fort
(1828 - 1842), West Point
A fortified settlers house at Woods' Prairie used for protection against Indians. Site marked, located 1.5 miles west of town. Woods, originally from Missouri, was killed in the Dawson Massacre in September 1842.

Camp Burleson
(1839), near Clearview ?
A Texas Army post located a few miles downstream of Bastrop, probably on the land of Col. Edward Burleson on the west bank of the Colorado River.

Fort Puesta del Colorado
(1805 - unknown), Bastrop
A Spanish fort built to protect the Colorado River crossing of the El Camino Real (King's Highway).

Fort Mina
(1825 - 1836), near Bastrop
A settlers' town stockade for protection against Indians, located on the Colorado River at Alum Creek about seven miles east of town. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony. Briefly abandoned in 1836, the settlement was renamed Bastrop in 1837.

John Ridgeway's Fort
(1830's), near McDade or Fedor
A settlers' fortified house located on West Yegua Creek, about 15 miles northeast of Camp Burleson, along the present-day Lee - Bastrop County line. Attacked by Indians in 1841.

Barker's Fort
(1830's), near Bastrop ?
A settlers' fortified house on the Colorado River, built after 1828 by either Jesse or Calvin Barker. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony. Location undetermined.

Josiah Wilbarger's Fort
(1832 - 1840's), near Utley
A settlers' stockaded log cabin located in Wilbarger's Prairie on the west side of Wilbarger Creek. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony. Wilbarger died in 1844. Marker at site is missing or no longer exists.

Martin Wells' Fort
(1830's - 1840's), near Webberville
A settlers' fortified house (actually three adjacent cabins with no stockade) located on the north bank of the Colorado River about three miles southeast of town. Texas Rangers were posted here in 1840 (Fort Wells) under the command of Lt. Moses Wells. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony.

Hamilton's Fort
(1835 ? - unknown), near Webberville
A settlers' fortified house built after 1835 by brothers Alex, William, James, and John, located on the north bank of the Colorado River on the "Duty Grant", just east of the present-day Bastrop - Travis County line. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony.

Duty's Fort (1)
(1830's - 1840's), near Webberville
A settlers' fortified house built by brothers George and Joseph Duty, located on the north bank of the Colorado River about two miles southeast of town. It was briefly abandoned in 1836. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony.

John Webber's Fort
(1832 - 1840's), Webberville
A settlers' fortified home located on the north bank of the Colorado River at Webber's Prairie, about 15 miles east of Austin. This was part of Stephen Austin's second colony. Webber (a white) had a mixed-race family, was shunned by other white settlers and was forced to sell in 1853. A post office was established here in 1846. Brick ruins remain at the site, which was threatened to become a landfill in 2007.

Camp Cazneau (1)
(1840), near Pilot Knob
A temporary Texas Army post on Onion Creek.

Reuben Hornsby's Fort
(1832 - 1840's), Hornsby
A settlers' fort located on the north bank of the Colorado River at Hornsby Bend, seven miles east of Austin, south of Walter E. Long Lake Metro Park. Also known as Hornsby's Station. The Hornsby Cemetery is at or near the actual site. A state marker is located one-half mile east of the cemetery.

Robert Mitchell's Fort
(1830's), near Montopolis
A settlers' fortified home located on the south bank of the Colorado River at Mitchell's Bend, about three miles east of town, opposite Hornsby's Fort.

Fort Colorado
(1836 - 1838), Austin
A Texas Ranger post located north of the Colorado River west of Walnut Creek, seven miles east of downtown. Also called Fort Coleman and Fort Houston (2). Consisted of several log cabins enclosed by a stockade with two blockhouses in opposite corners. Marker located on East Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. at Old Fort Hill Drive, about two and one-half miles north-northeast of the Montopolis Bridge (US 183). This was located in the south part of what later became known as "Fort Prairie", where a post office was established in the 1880's (to c.1940). Site on or adjacent to the Austin Wildlife Rescue facility.

Camp Colorado (1836) was a temporary tent camp nearby while the main fort was being built.

Camp on Walnut Creek (1)
(1839), Austin
A Texas Army camp located at or near the site of Fort Colorado.

Camp Cooke (1)
(1841), Austin
An assembly camp for the Texan Santa Fe Expedition, located at or near the mouth of Waller Creek in downtown, or possibly at Walnut Creek (the site of the earlier Fort Colorado) to the east.

Camp Austin (1)
(1839), Austin
A Texas Army post during the initial settlement and construction of the capital. Located at Waterloo (1838), which was the original name of the first settlement. Site at or near the present-day Congress Ave. bridge. After the majority of new government buildings were constructed and occupied, the troops and engineer parties were dispersed to new camps surrounding the town, many along Walnut Creek.

Fort Austin (1)
(1840 - 1841), Austin
The Texas Army fortified the capitol building during a civil crisis, with a stockade and artillery emplacements. The one-story frame capitol was set back from Congress Avenue on a hill at what is now the corner of Colorado and Eighth Streets. Troops guarded the capitol building from June 1840 to March 1841.

Camp Lamar
(1839 - 1840), near Austin
A Texas Army camp. Location undetermined.

Camp McLeod
(1839 - 1840), near Austin
A Texas Army camp. Location undetermined.

Camp Bell (2)
(1840), near Austin
A Texas Army camp. Location undetermined.

Camp Bell (3)
(1841), near Austin
A Texan Santa Fe Expedition camp. Location undetermined, possibly at the site of Camp Bell (2), or near Camp Cooke (1).

Post of Austin (2)
(1848 - 1852, 1865 - 1875), Austin
A Federal infantry post and supply depot, also called Camp Austin (2), was established in 1848 as a 236-foot square stockade on the north bank of the Colorado River, most likely near the Arsenal on Waller Creek. There is no further record of U.S. Army troops in the city after 1852. Regarrisoned by Union cavalry after the Civil War, a new post was built one mile west of town in 1866 named Camp Sanders, located in the area of present-day West Sixth Street and the Mo-Pac Expressway (TX 1).

Austin Arsenal (1840 - 1875) was originally a Texas Army post located on Waller Creek, in the block bound by present-day East Ave. and Red River Street, and by East First and Second Streets. Ceded to the United States in 1845. Became the headquarters of the Confederate Post of Austin (3) during the Civil War. The arsenal did produce percussion caps for the Confederacy during the war. The property was deeded to the city after Reconstruction for educational use. The Palm School was built here in 1892, closed in 1976 becoming a Travis County government office building.
(thanks to Randy Gilbert for providing correct location)

Fort Magruder (2)
(1863 - 1864), Austin
Confederate defenses were hastily built in December 1863 after Union forces took Brownsville in November, and it was feared that a Union column would march north towards San Antonio and Austin. As it turned out, the city was never threatened, and the fort never saw any action.
Principally located at the northwest corner of South Congress Avenue and Ben White Boulevard. The full site was bound by present-day Post Road Drive to Radam Lane, and South First Street to South Congress Ave.. The Reliant Rehabilitation Hospital of Austin and other commercial properties now occupy much of the site. A site along Wadford Street below Dunlap Street was excavated in 1992 prior to the expansion of Ben White Blvd.. State marker located at 3903 South Congress Ave..

Camp Mabry (State Military Reservation)
(1892 - present), Austin
Originally a TX National Guard summer training camp, still used today by the Army Reserve and TX National Guard. Used as a muster site for state troops during the Spanish-American War (1898). Federalized in 1917 and 1941 for Army training and as a supply center. Became the headquarters of the TX National Guard in 1954. Of interest here is the Texas Military Forces Museum.

Austin Army Ground School
(1917 - 1919), Austin
An Army Ground School on the University of Texas campus.

Camp Walnut Creek (2)
(1839), Austin
A Texan Santa Fe Expedition camp located on Walnut Creek at the crossing of the military road to Little River Fort, about eight miles northeast of downtown, near Sprinkle.

Camp Slaughter (2)
(1864), near Austin
A CSA encampment near the Bryan Plantation. Location undetermined.

Camp Caldwell (2)
(1839 - 1840), near Round Rock
A Texas Army post on the south bank of Brushy Creek, about two and one-half miles east of town.

Thomas Kenney's Fort
(1839 - 1842), near Round Rock
A settlers' stockaded blockhouse with four log cabins, built by Kenney and Joseph Barnhart, for protection against Indians. Possibly renamed Fort Cazneau in May 1840. Attacked by Comanche Indians in August 1840. Texas militia briefly occupied the fort in September 1840 after the attack, which was then renamed Fort Dunnington. Located on the south side of the confluence of Brushy Creek and Dyer's Creek, about 2.5 miles east of town. A monument (1936) is located one-half mile north of the actual fort site, and which is also probably the actual site of Camp Caldwell (2).

Camp Cazneau (2)
(1841), near Round Rock
A Texan Santa Fe Expedition assembly camp located on the south bank of Brushy Creek about 2.5 miles east of town, at the "Double File Crossing", very close to Kenney's Fort. A monument was erected here in 1925.

John Tumlinson's (Jr.) Blockhouse
(1836), near Leander
A Texas Ranger post located at the head of Brushy Creek, about three miles south of town. Abandoned when news arrived that the Mexican Army invaded Texas. It was then afterwards reported burned by Indians, although it may have actually still existed as late as 1843. Marker located on US 183.

Camp San Gabriel
(1840), Georgetown
A Texas Army camp located at the San Gabriel River crossing between Austin and Little River, just east of town.

Camp Archer
(1841), near Georgetown
A Texan Santa Fe Expedition camp, possibly located at the San Gabriel River crossing between Austin and Little River, at or near the site of Camp San Gabriel; or possibly located on Berry Creek about five miles north of town.

William Black's Fort
(1851 - 1868), near Bertram
A settlers' fortified stone house built for protection against Indians. Located about nine miles east of town on the South San Gabriel River. Monument (1936) at site.

Fort Croghan
(1849 - 1855), Burnet
Originally a Texas Ranger post known as McCulloch's Station was located here in 1849. The site then became a Federal Dragoon post called Post on Hamilton Creek. Originally located on the north bank of Hamilton Creek, it was moved three and one-half miles upstream to the south bank in 1849 and renamed Camp Croghan, but soon renamed again to Camp Hamilton (1). Renamed again in 1850. A restoration of several original log buildings and the post's parade ground are in a city park at 703 Buchanan Drive, jointly operated by the Burnet County Heritage Society and the Burnet County Historical Commission. See also Handbook of Texas Online || Genealogy Search Group
Burnet County TX GenWeb

Presidio de San Xavier de Gigedo
(1751 - 1755), near Rockdale
Also known as Presidio de San Francisco Xavier. Located south of the San Gabriel (San Xavier) River, about five miles from town, built to protect the three Spanish missions established in the vicinity (Mission de Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria (1749 - 1755); Mission de San Ildefonso (1748 - 1755); and Mission de San Francisco Xavier de Horcasitas (1748 - 1755), which replaced the earlier Mission Nuestra Señora de los Dolores del Río de San Xavier (1745 - 1748)). Abandoned in 1755 for Presidio de San Marcos.

Fort Lamar (1a)
(1837), Milam County
A town fort planned for the proposed town of Lamar in Milam County. It is not known if the fort was ever built. Weapons (small arms) were ordered for and sent to "Fort Lamar" by E.L.R. Wheelock, the promoter of the town, in August 1837. However, they may have actually been sent to Wheelock's Fort in Wheelock, Robertson County. (See also Wheelock's Fort on page 1)

Camp Walker
(1839), Milam or Burleson Counties ?
A Texas Ranger post located on the land of Willam Walker. Exact location undetermined, it was "several days march" from the Falls of the Brazos.

Fort Cameron
(1870), Cameron
No data.

Benjamin Bryant's Fort
(1837 - 1840's), near Val Verde
A fortified trading post established as a buffer between the Indians to the west and the white settlers to the east. Texas Rangers operated out of here in 1841 (Fort Bryant). The settlement around the post later became known as Bryant's Station. Located on the Little River southwest of Buckholts, a marker is six miles west. A family cemetery remains, located just north of Buckholts.

Childers' Settlement Station
(1840), near Rogers
A settlers' fortified place built by Goldsby Childers, located on the north bank of the Little River about four miles southwest of town, a few miles above Bryant's Station. A Texas Army detachment was posted here in 1840.

Little River Fort
(1836 - 1837, 1840 - 1841, 1846), near Little River
A Texas Ranger stockaded log blockhouse and six cabins built for protection of nearby settlements from Indians, located on the Leon River about one mile above the Lampasas River, just west of the present-day community. Officially named Fort Smith (1) until 1837, but it was more commonly known by its location. The Rangers withdrew from the fort in 1837 but settlers, hunters, and adventurers continued to use it. It was regarrisoned in 1840. Sometime after it was abandoned again in 1841, it was named Fort Griffin (1) after Moses Griffin, a settler who maintained the post for several years. All structures were later removed sometime after 1846, when the last known use by Texas Rangers occurred.

Camp Navarro (1841) was a Texan Santa Fe Expedition assembly camp located adjacent to the Little River Fort. The officers were quartered within Little River Fort.

Camp Lynch
(1839), near San Saba
A Texas Army post located on the west bank of the Colorado River about three miles below the mouth of the San Saba River, one mile below the present-day US 190 bridge.

John Duncan's Fort ?
(1858 - 1865), Richland Springs
A settlers' fort built for protection against Indians. In use through the Civil War.

Camp McMillan
(1862 - 1864), Hall
A CSA Frontier Regiment / Texas Ranger post located at Hall's Spring at the head of Richland Creek.

Camp San Sabá (2)
(1861 - 1864, 1868), Camp San Sabá
A CSA Frontier Regiment / Texas Ranger post. Briefly occupied by Federal troops in 1868 before the re-establishment of Fort McKavett.

Fort Mason
(1851 - 1862, 1866 - 1869, 1870), Mason
A Federal Dragoon post located on the west bank of Comanche Creek. It was the headquarters of the 2nd Cavalry, under the command of Colonel Robert E. Lee. It was his last command in the Federal Army before the Civil War. The fort was mostly abandoned from 1861 to 1866, except for brief stints in 1861 by the CSA Texas Mounted Rifles, and in 1862 as a CSA POW camp. No remains except rock foundations in some places, but the Officers' quarters was reconstructed on Post Hill in 1975 on the original foundation, located five blocks south of the Mason County courthouse, owned by the Mason County Historical Society. Several homes in town were built with the original stones from the fort. The Mason County Museum in town at 300 Moody Street was once a schoolhouse that was built from the fort's materials in the 1870's. See also Handbook of Texas Online

Camp Llano
(1862 - 1864), Mason County
A CSA Frontier Regiment / Texas Ranger post located near the convergence of Rock Creek at the Llano River.

Fort Martin Scott (Historic Park)
(Fort Martin Scott Garrison)
(Fort Martin Scott Museum Association)
(1848 - 1853, 1866), Fredericksburg
A Federal infantry post located on Baron's Creek two miles south of town, originally named Camp Houston. Renamed in 1849. The German settlers in the area had already signed a treaty of friendship with the Comanches in 1847, therefore no hostile action ever occurred here. Between 1851 and 1853 it served mainly as a forage depot for other nearby posts. Re-occupied by Federal troops briefly in 1866 before it was abandoned. The restored guardhouse is the only original building remaining. Two Officers' quarters have been reconstructed, and a visitor center is on site. Site is owned by the city and operated by the Gillespie County Historical Society. See also Handbook of Texas Online || Texas Escapes Magazine
Honor the Treaty of 1847

Camp Davis (2)
(1862 - 1864), near Fredericksburg
A CSA Frontier Regiment / Texas Ranger post located about four miles from the convergence of White Oak Creek at the Pedernales River.

Blanco Fort Houses ?
(1853 - unknown), Blanco County
Several area settler houses were later fortified to protect against Indians, but none still exist. Names and locations undetermined.


NEED MORE INFO: Street names in Austin: Fort Branch Blvd. near Springdale Park, Fort Davis Cove near Bull Creek Park.
Towns:

NOTE: The use of the Texas flag for settler forts before 1836 indicates those settlers of Anglo-American origin, even though Texas did not exist as a separate nation until 1836.

East Texas - page 1 | Coastal Texas I - page 2 | Coastal Texas II - page 3
North Central Texas - page 4 | South Central Texas - page 6 | Southern Texas - page 7
West Texas - page 8 | Southwestern Texas - page 9

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